Engine start

With everything assembled, and with TomB engineering’s assistance, it was finally time to see if the engine would start.

The engine was checked over and all the torque settings were confirmed.  For the heads this meant an initial tightening followed by a final tightening when the manifold had been bolted on.

The engine was mounted up to a refurbished gear box I’d acquired earlier, along with a starter motor that was sold-as-seen.  With no clutch between the gearbox input splines and the engine flywheel this mean that the starter motor would be able to turn the engine over without driving the gearbox.  With the wiring loom attached to provide power to the ignition and fuel pump, the coil and HT leads in place to provide juice to the spark plugs and a battery wired up to the starter and earthed to the gearbox it was ready to go.

The initial push of the ignition button was rewarded by a click and whirr from the starter motor, so at least that was good.  The ignition is the same 123 unit fitted to Judith  so the indicator light showed that it was powered and the timing could be set.  However, the fuel pump wasn’t priming.  Once we’d worked it out it was obvious: the loom had no earth – when it’s in the car it has all sorts of earths that make their way back to the gearbox but that was missing here.  One fly lead later and the fuel pump primed and filled the carburettor.

Now we were ready to go again but the battery was now flat from turning over the engine whilst we were trying to diagnose the fuel pump’s missing earth – the starter would click but not whirr.  Running jump cables from Lotte gave us the power we needed and, after a few seconds it caught!  It ran for about 20s before starting to die and I cut the ignition.  Still, that’s pretty impressive given the choke and throttle were set at about half as a guess – some dynamic adjustment of them could probably have kept it alive.

2CV engine, gearbox and wiring loom

All in all I’m very happy with this: I’ve rebuilt an engine and it ran.

Replacing a Citroen C1 exhaust

On my way down to York in the C1 I pulled into the excellent Mainsgill Farm Shop for some provisions. As I made my way across the car park there was a rattle from the back.  A quick visual inspection revealed the cause – the exhaust hanger on the back box had snapped and it was resting on the rear beam.

C1 back box with broken hanger

Whilst it was still attached when I left home, it had presumably managed some distance before I had noticed. It wasn’t dragging, and it wasn’t leaking so I figured it would make it the rest of the way to York.

Before heading home, TomB engineering fashioned me a temporary exhaust hanger that was more than adequate to get me back.

Jury rigged C1 exhaust hanger

The culprit was pretty easy to identify – the hanger was heavily corroded and the 10 years of vibrations had caused it to neck to breaking point.

Ncked C1 exhust hanger

The following weekend I took a trip to TMS motor spares to pick up a new back box.  Getting the old back box off proved somewhat challenging – first I had to cut off what was left of the old exhaust clamp as the bolts were more rust than metal.  Then it came to separating the joint with the centre pipe.

C1 exhaust pipe joint

This did not want to budge – despite persuasion with a full tang screwdriver and a mallet.  As it had gone bad I had to cut it off. 

However, I was expecting this to be a butt joint – as on the 2CV – but, once I’d finished cutting, I realised it had been a socket joint…

C1 exhaust joint after cutting

So, at this point I knew I was now going to need a new centre section even if I didn’t want to fully admit it to myself yet –  especially given it was now Saturday afternoon meaning I wouldn’t be able to get a new pipe until Monday morning.

Still, I could still remove the old centre section in preparation.  Fortunately the two spring loaded bolts that went into the cat exit flange weren’t too badly corroded and were only a two swear rating to free up.  Being the same age as the rear section, the centre section was, unsurprisingly, similarly heavy with surface rust even if it wasn’t holed. 

However, once it was off the car and I could have a good look at it I found that the front exhaust hanger was in much the same state as the rear – heavily necked and not far off failing.

Necked C1 exhaust hanger

So it turned out to be fortunate that I’d cut through the wrong bit as it now meant that I was going to be replacing it before it failed and whilst I had everything apart anyway.  If it had failed in a few weeks time and I’d had to spend another weekend under the car swearing at the exhaust I would have blamed past me for not having done the job right in the first place.

There was still one major obstacle to overcome – getting the oxygen sensor out.

C1 exhaust section with oxygen sensor

The Book of Lies™ says “The oxygen sensors are delicate and may not work if dropped or knocked, if the power supply is disrupted, or if any cleaning materials are used on them.”  I translated that to mean: “Dose it in penetrating fluid, apply blow torch until cherry red, clamp with mole grips and beat with a hammer.”

C1 oxygen sensor removal kit

The only alteration I made to that was to substitute the mole grips for a correctly sized 22m spanner.  With the aid of +2 gloves of power and full application of my not inconsiderable body weight, after a few heat cycles it came free and I went backwards, fortunately my landing was cushioned by my not inconsiderable derrière.  A four swear rating for this job.

Reassembly was the reverse of removal – but without a blowtorch and an angle grinder.  Joking aside, everything went back together remarkably easily – the only point of note is there’s a gasket made of compressed wire wool in the joint between the cat and the centre section.

With the exhaust fitted and everything tightened up nicely I turned on the engine to check for leaks – all good!

New C1 exhaust

I was concerned that I might have damaged the oxygen sensor when spraying Super Crack Ultra on the cherry red mounting but the ECU seemed happy.

No fault codes

After a short shakedown it was still holding together so I went for a longer run to get everything fully up to temperature – there were some funky hot metal smells which would have been worrying if I hadn’t just replaced the exhaust but everything held up fine.

Job jobbed.

Blade fuse box for a 2CV

The original 2CV fuse box uses glass fuses in a plastic case glued to the firewall at the back of the engine.  As long as nothing goes wrong with it this works as well as it needs to but it’s not a solution you’d choose to keep if you were changing things.

2CV glass fuse box

As I’ve got a bare wiring loom for my Burton project, and I’ve done the hard work of identifying which connector is which, it was a relatively simple – if time consuming – task to replace each of the old glass fuse terminals with a female blade connector and cover them with an appropriately coloured piece of heat shrink.   These then fit onto the male blade terminals of a generic after market fuse box.

2CV blade fuze box

Whilst there are only five fuses in a standard 2CV fuse box I’ve gone for eight as that gives me room to add fuses for some of the additional circuits I’m going to be adding – notably an electric fuel pump.

2CV wiring loom debugging

Whilst still not objectively easy, having a stripped wiring loom makes it significantly easier to identify which connector is which.  To start with I’ll need the ignition and starter circuits so I can run the engine but having five holes in the wiring loom where the fuses are supposed to go makes figuring out what’s what more difficult than needs be.

So, after an evening probing around with a multimeter I’ve now identified both ends of all five fuses and which of those ends match up.

2CV wiring loom fuse connectors

To make my life easier I have numbered them from 1 to 5:

  1. Instruments, indicator, wipers, alternator field (16A)
  2. Stop, interior and hazard lights (16A)
  3. Near side running lights (10A)
  4. Fog light (16A)
  5. Off side running lights (10A)

Next step will to be connect these up to a blade fuse box which will make life significantly easier and allow for fusing additional circuits.

Continued De-clarting of tinware

After the initial de-clarting of the tinware I now moved on to trying to clean them up further. However, after the best part of a day (or what passes for daylight hours at this time of year) with various abrasives and power tools I’d not made much more than an impact on the surface.

Dyanne tinware

As this has now sucked more than enough of my time I’ve opted to pay to have them sand blasted.

In the mean time I’ve picked up a new set of fixings to hold it all together when it’s done.

Burton 2CV tinware fixings

Electric fuel pump and inertia cut-out

As I’d blanked off the mechanical fuel pump mounting I needed an electric fuel pump.  This came in the form of a Hucco 133010 engine mounted (suction) pump that can deliver the 2.6-2.9 psi specified in the Citroen Workshop Manual for the fuel system.

Hucco 133010 fuel pump and inertia cut-out

For safety I have also got an inertia cut-out that will isolate the fuel pump in the event of an impact to minimise the risk of fuel being pumped out of a split or disconnected fuel line in the engine bay.

De-clarted tinware

I’ve got some Dyane tinware for the Burton engine, this has the “back end of a horse power” forced induction take off and the cylinder covers are metal rather than whatever it is the later 2CVs used. However, it’s seen better days so needs some renovation.

First off the engine mounts needed removing with the aid of heat, Super Crack Ultra, and an impact driver.  With that done I’ve declarted them using pound shop oven cleaner.

Dyane tinware being cleaned

Next step will be to give them a thorough going over with various grades of abrasive.

Orkney EVs

Orkney’s mainland has very good EV infrastructure, not really surprising when there are so many wind generators round the island and if you’re driving for more than 30 miles you’re either going back on yourself or you’re in the sea.

As well as the usual suspects in the form of many Nissan Leafs and the occasional Tesla I have seen a few of both PSA flavours of the Mitubishi i-MiEV EV – normally a very rare sight.

Citroën C0 Citroën C0
Peugeot iOn

Fully Charged has been to Orkney and is covering the renewable technology.