Blade fuse box for a 2CV

The original 2CV fuse box uses glass fuses in a plastic case glued to the firewall at the back of the engine.  As long as nothing goes wrong with it this works as well as it needs to but it’s not a solution you’d choose to keep if you were changing things.

2CV glass fuse box

As I’ve got a bare wiring loom for my Burton project, and I’ve done the hard work of identifying which connector is which, it was a relatively simple – if time consuming – task to replace each of the old glass fuse terminals with a female blade connector and cover them with an appropriately coloured piece of heat shrink.   These then fit onto the male blade terminals of a generic after market fuse box.

2CV blade fuze box

Whilst there are only five fuses in a standard 2CV fuse box I’ve gone for eight as that gives me room to add fuses for some of the additional circuits I’m going to be adding – notably an electric fuel pump.

2CV wiring loom debugging

Whilst still not objectively easy, having a stripped wiring loom makes it significantly easier to identify which connector is which.  To start with I’ll need the ignition and starter circuits so I can run the engine but having five holes in the wiring loom where the fuses are supposed to go makes figuring out what’s what more difficult than needs be.

So, after an evening probing around with a multimeter I’ve now identified both ends of all five fuses and which of those ends match up.

2CV wiring loom fuse connectors

To make my life easier I have numbered them from 1 to 5:

  1. Instruments, indicator, wipers, alternator field (16A)
  2. Stop, interior and hazard lights (16A)
  3. Near side running lights (10A)
  4. Fog light (16A)
  5. Off side running lights (10A)

Next step will to be connect these up to a blade fuse box which will make life significantly easier and allow for fusing additional circuits.

2CV wiring loom strip

I’ve got a salvage wiring loom that I’m going to work up ready to fit on the Burton.  The first step is to remove the wrapping to get to the wires.

This is best done with a seam ripper, it will cut the wrapping without damaging the wires themselves.

Removing tape from a 2CV wiring loom with a seam ripper

As the wrapping is removed re-usable cable ties are put at the junctions to keep the loom together whilst still allowing wires to be added and removed.

Wiring loom held with re-usable zip ties